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Pabbajita Abhiṇha Suttaṃ

(A.v.87)

Facts for Constant Recollection by One Gone-forth

“These ten facts, monks, should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth. What ten?

  1. ‘I have no caste,’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth
  2. ‘My livelihood depends on others,’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth. [88]
  3. ‘I should not do what others do,’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth
  4. ‘Do I reprove myself about my morality?’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.
  5. ‘Do my wise companions in the holy life reprove me for my morality?’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.
  6. ‘All that is mine, beloved and pleasing, will become otherwise, will be separated from me,’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.
  7. ‘I am the owner of my kamma, I am the heir to my kamma, kamma is my origin, I am related to my kamma, I have kamma as my refuge and protection, whatever good or evil kamma I do, of that I will become the heir,’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.
  8. ‘How am I spending my days and nights?’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth
  9. ‘Do I delight in solitary dwellings?’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.
  10. ‘Have I attained any superior human states, any knowledge and vision worthy of the Nobles Ones such that when questioned in my final moments by my fellows in the holy life I will not be embarrassed?’ should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.

These ten facts, monks, should be constantly recollected by one gone-forth.

Notes:

1. Whether one goes forth from the brahmin or noble caste, from the merchants or workers caste, or from a family of slaves or beggars, one gone-forth loses any status he or she might have had while a householder, and all become equal in the Saṅgha. Whereas, as a householder, one might wear fine clothes, and eat delicious food from gold plates, one gone-forth only wears rag-robes (or whatever suitable robes are offered), and eats any kind of food gathered on almsround from a bowl of iron or clay.

2. The way that a monastic behaves should be graceful and dignified. One gone-forth should not run or jump, dance or play, tap the feet or clap, laugh and make jokes, etc. There are 75 training rules dealing with entering the village for alms, eating and drinking, and urinating, defecating, and spitting. There are many other minor rules outside of the Pātimokkha dealing with decorum.

3. A monastic should reflect whether he or she is fulfilling his or her monastic duties, rehearsing and studying the teachings, and practising systematic attention. A monastic has numerous duties to respect the elders, tend the sick, to look after requisites and dwelling-place, to study the teachings, and to practise meditation. Novices and lay monastery attendants are included in those gone-forth.


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