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Mahāsatipaṭṭhāna Suttaṃ

(D.ii.290)

The Greater Discourse on the Foundations of Mindfulness

See An Exposition of the Satipaṭṭhāna Sutta for Pali Text and Comments

372. “Thus have I heard — at one time the Blessed One was dwelling among the Kurū people, at Kammāsadhamma, a market town of the Kurū people. There the Blessed One addressed the monks — “Monks!” “Venerable sir,” those monks replied to the Blessed One. Then the Blessed One said:–

Introduction

373. “This is the only way, monks, for the purification of beings, for the transcendence of grief and lamentation, for the extinguishing of pain and sorrow, for attaining the right method, for the realisation of nibbāna, that is to say the four foundations of mindfulness.”

“What four? Here, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body, ardent, clearly comprehending, and mindful, having overcome covetousness and sorrow concerning the world; he dwell contemplating feelings in feelings, … he dwells contemplating thoughts in thoughts … he dwells contemplating mental-objects in mental-objects ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome covetousness and sorrow concerning the world.” [291]

#MahasatipatthanaTop#FourPosturesSectionBody Contemplation:

Mindfulness of Breathing Section

374. “How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating the body in the body? Here, monks a monk, having gone to a forest, to the root of a tree, or to an empty place, having sat down cross-legged, and sitting erect, he establishes mindfulness in front of his face. He breathes in mindfully, he breathes out mindfully. When breathing in a long breath he knows, ‘I breathe in a long breath.’ When breathing in a short breath he knows, ‘I breathe in a short breath.’ When breathing out a long breath he knows, ‘I breathe out a long breath.’ When breathing out a short breath he knows, ‘I breathe out a short breath.’ ‘Experiencing the entire breath I will breathe in,’ he trains himself. ‘Experiencing the entire breath I will breathe out,’ he trains himself. ‘Calming the bodily formations I will breath in,’ he trains himself. ‘Calming the bodily formations I will breath out,’ he trains himself.”

“Just, monks, as a skilful turner or a turner's apprentice knows a long pull when a long pull is made, or knows a short pull when a short pull is made, even so, monks, a monk when breathing in a long inhalation is conscious of breathing in a long inhalation, or breathing out a long exhalation is conscious of breathing out a long exhalation, or breathing in a short inhalation is conscious of breathing in a short inhalation, or breathing out a short exhalation is conscious of breathing out a short exhalation. He trains himself to be clearly conscious of the whole of the in-coming breath at its beginning, its middle, and at its end. He trains himself to be clearly conscious of the whole of the out-going breath at its beginning, its middle, and at its end. He trains himself to calm down the strong inhalation as he breathes in. He trains himself to calm down the strong exhalation as he breathes out. [292]

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally (his own body), or he dwells contemplating the body externally (the body of another), or he dwells contemplating both. He dwells contemplating origination factors in the body, or he dwells contemplating dissolution factors in the body, or he dwells contemplating origination and dissolution factors in the body. Or his mindfulness is established with the thought: ‘The body exists,’ just to the extent necessary for knowledge and mindfulness. He dwells independent and clings to nothing in the world. Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#ClearComprehensionSectionFour Postures Section

375. Again, monks, when walking, a monk knows, ‘I am walking,’ or when standing, he knows, ‘I am standing,’ or when sitting he knows, ‘I am sitting,’ or when lying down, he knows ‘I am lying down,’ or however his body is disposed, he knows it.

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#AttentiontoRepulsivenessSectionClear Comprehension Section

376. “Again, monks, a monk, in going and coming practises clear comprehension; in looking ahead or to the side, he practises clear comprehension; in bending and stretching the limbs, he practises clear comprehension; in carrying the double robe and alms-bowl, and wearing the robes, he practises clear comprehension; in eating, drinking, chewing, and tasting, he practises clear comprehension; in defecating and urinating, he practises clear comprehension; in walking, standing, or sitting, in falling asleep and waking up, in speaking or remaining silent, he practises clear comprehension.” [293]

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#AttentiontotheElementsSectionAttention to Repulsiveness Section

377. “Again, monks, a monk reflects on this very body encased in skin and full of various foul things from the soles of the feet to the hairs on top of the head — in this body are head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skinflesh, sinews, bones, bone-marrow, kidneysheart, liver, membranes, spleen, lungslarge intestine, small intestine, stomach, faeces, [brain];⁴ bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat;⁵ tears, grease, saliva, snot, synovial fluid, and urine.” ⁶

“It is, monks, like a bag with an opening at each end, full of various kinds of grain such as hill-paddy, paddy, green gram, cow-pea, sesame and husked rice; and a man with sound eyes, having opened it, should examine and reflect on the contents thus: ‘This is hill-paddy, this is lowland-paddy, this is green gram, this is cow-pea, this is sesame, this is husked rice,’ even so, monks, a monk examines and reflects on this very body, from the soles of the feet to the top of the hair on the head, enclosed by the skin and full of manifold impurities, ‘There are in this body: hair of the head …[294]  urine.’”

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#NineCemeteryObjectsSectionAttention to the Elements Section

378. “Again, monks, a monk reflects on the elements in this very body however it is disposed — ‘In this body are the earth element, the water element, the fire element, and the wind element.’”

“Just, monks, as a skilful butcher or a butcher’s apprentice, having slaughtered a cow, and cut it up into portions, sits at a cross-roads. Similarly, monks, a monk reflects on the four elements in this very body however it is disposed — in this body are the elements of earth, water, fire, and air.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … [295] Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#ContemplationofFeelingsNine Cemetery Objects Section

379. “Again, monks, if a monk should see a body in the cemetery, one, two, or three days dead, bloated, blue or black in colour, and festering, he compares his own body to it: “This very body too is of the same nature, it will become like that, and it has not transcended that.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

“Again, monks, if a monk should see a body in the cemetery, being devoured by crows, being devoured by hawks, being devoured by vultures, being devoured by herons, being devoured by dogs, being devoured by tigers, being devoured by leopards, being devoured by jackals, or being devoured by various kinds of worms, he compares his own body to it: “This very body too is of the same nature, it will become like that, and it has not transcended that.” [296]

“Again, monks, if a monk should see a body in the cemetery, reduced to a skeleton held together by tendons, with some flesh and blood still adhering to it … reduced to a skeleton held together by tendons, blood-besmeared, fleshless … reduced to a skeleton still held together by tendons, without flesh and blood … reduced to loose bones scattered in all directions — at one place bones of a hand, at another place bones of a foot, at another place ankle-bones, at another place shin-bones, at another place thigh-bones, at another place hip-bones, at another place rib-bones, at another place spinal-bones, [297] at another place shoulder-bones, at another place neck-bones, at another place the jawbone, at another place the teeth, at another place the skull, he compares his own body to it: “This very body too is of the same nature, it will become like that, and it has not transcended that.”

“Again, monks, if a monk should see a body in the cemetery, reduced to bleached bones of conch-like colour … reduced to bones more than a year old, lying in a heap … reduced to rotted bones, crumbling to dust, he compares his own body to it: “This very body too is of the same nature, it will become like that, and it has not transcended that.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating the body internally … [298] Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body.”

#MahasatipatthanaTop#ContemplationofThoughtsContemplation of Feelings

380. “How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating feelings? Here, monk, a monk, when feeling a pleasant feeling he knows, ‘I feel a pleasant feeling.’ When feeling a painful feeling he knows, ‘I feel a painful feeling.’ When feeling a neutral feeling he knows, ‘I feel a neutral feeling.’ When feeling a pleasant sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel a pleasant sensual feeling.’ When feeling a pleasant non-sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel a pleasant non-sensual feeling.’ When feeling an unpleasant sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel an unpleasant sensual feeling.’ When feeling an unpleasant non-sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel an unpleasant non-sensual feeling.’ When feeling a neutral sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel a neutral sensual feeling.’ When feeling a neutral non-sensual feeling he knows, ‘I feel a neutral non-sensual feeling.’”

“Thus he dwells contemplating feelings internally … [299] Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating feelings in feelings.”

#MahasatipatthanaTop#ContemplationofMental-objectsContemplation of Thoughts

381. “Again, monks, how does a monk dwell contemplating thoughts in thoughts? Here, monks, when a thought with lust ⁷ is present he knows, ‘A lustful thought is present.’ When a thought free from lust is present he knows, ‘A thought free from lust is present.’ When a thought with anger ⁸ is present he knows, ‘A thought with anger  is present.’ When a thought free from anger is present he knows, ‘A thought free from anger is present.’ When a deluded thought ⁹ is present he knows, ‘A deluded thought  is present.’ When an undeluded thought is present he knows, ‘An undeluded thought is present.’ When a lazy¹⁰ (contracted) mind is present he knows, ‘A lazy mind is present.’ When a distracted  (restless)¹¹ mind is present he know, ‘A distracted mind is present.’ When a lofty ¹² mind is present he knows, ‘A lofty mind is present.’ When a non-lofty ¹³ mind is present he knows, ‘A non-lofty mind is present.’ When an inferior  ¹⁴ mind is present he knows, ‘An inferior mind is present.’ When a superior ¹⁵ mind is present he knows, ‘A superior mind is present.’ When a composed ¹⁶ mind is present he knows, ‘A composed mind is present.’ When an uncomposed mind is present he knows, ‘An uncomposed mind is present.’ When a liberated ¹⁷ mind is present he knows, ‘A liberated mind is present.’ When an unliberated mind is present he knows, ‘An unliberated mind is present.’

“Thus he dwells contemplating thoughts internally … [300] Thus, too, monks, a monk dwells contemplating thoughts in thoughts.”

#MahasatipatthanaTop#AggregatesSectionContemplation of Mental-objects

Hindrances Section

382. “How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in mental-objects? Here, monks, a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the five hindrances. How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the five hindrances?

“Here, monks, when sensual desire is present a monk knows, ‘Sensual desire is present.’ When sensual desire is absent he knows, ‘Sensual desire is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen sensual desire comes to arise, how the arisen sensual desire comes to be abandoned, and how the abandoned sensual desire does not arise again.

“Here, monks, when ill-will is present a monk knows, ‘Ill-will is present.’ When ill-will is absent he knows, ‘Ill-will is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen ill-will comes to arise, how the arisen ill-will comes to be abandoned, and how the abandoned ill-will does not arise again.

“Here, monks, when sloth and torpor is present a monk knows, ‘Sloth and torpor is present.’ When sloth and torpor is absent he knows, ‘Sloth and torpor is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen sloth and torpor comes to arise, how the arisen sloth and torpor comes to be abandoned, and how the abandoned sloth and torpor does not arise again.

“Here, monks, when restlessness and remorse is present [301] a monk knows, ‘Restlessness and remorse are present.’ When restlessness and remorse are absent he knows, ‘Restlessness and remorse are absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen restlessness and remorse come to arise, how the arisen restlessness and remorse come to be abandoned, and how the abandoned restlessness and remorse does not arise again.

“Here, monks, when doubt is present a monk knows, ‘Doubt is present.’ When doubt is absent he knows, ‘Doubt is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen doubt comes to arise, how the arisen doubt comes to be abandoned, and how the abandoned doubt does not arise again.

“Thus he dwells contemplating mental-objects internally and externally. While contemplating mental-objects, he is aware that they arise and pass away. His awareness is established that mental-objects exist, but that they are not a being, nor a person, neither a woman nor a man, not a self nor anything pertaining to a self. He does not regard mental-objects as “I” or “mine,” thus he clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the mental-objects of the five hindrances.

#SenseFacultiesSectionAggregates Section

383. “Again, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the mental-objects of the five aggregates of attachment. How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the mental-objects of the five aggregates of attachment? Here, monks, a monk knows: this is matter, this is the arising of matter, this is the disappearance of matter; this is feeling, … this is perception … this is mental formations [302] … this is consciousness, this is the arising of consciousness, this is the disappearance of consciousness.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating mental-objects internally and externally. While contemplating mental-objects, he is aware that they arise and pass away. His awareness is established that mental-objects exist, but that they are not a being, nor a person, neither a woman nor a man, not a self nor anything pertaining to a self. He does not regard mental-objects as “I”, or “mine,” thus he clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the five aggregates of attachment.”

#EnlightenmentFactorsSectionSense Faculties Section

384. “Again, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the six internal and external sense faculties. How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the six internal and external sense faculties?”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the eye and sights, and he knows the fetter that arises dependent on both. He also knows how the unarisen fetter comes to arise, how the arisen fetter comes to be abandoned, and how the abandoned fetter does not arise again.”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the ear and sounds … arise again.”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the nose and odours … arise again.”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the tongue and tastes … arise again.”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the body and touches … arise again.”

“Here, monks, a monk knows the mind and ideas … [303] arise again.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating mental-objects internally and externally. While contemplating mental-objects, he is aware that they arise and pass away. His awareness is established that mental-objects exist, but that they are not a being, nor a person, neither a woman nor a man, not a self nor anything pertaining to a self. He does not regard mental-objects as “I”, or “mine,” thus he clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the six internal and external sense faculties.”

#TheTruthsSectionEnlightenment Factors ­Section

385. “Again, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the seven enlightenment factors. How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the seven enlightenment factors? Here, monks, when the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is present in him a monk knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of mindfulness is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of mindfulness is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of mindfulness is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of mindfulness comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of mindfulness is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of investigation is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of investigation is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of investigation is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of investigation is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of investigation comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of investigation is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of energy is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of energy is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of energy is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of energy is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of energy comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of energy is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of joy is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of joy is present.’ [304] When the enlightenment factor of joy is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of joy is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of joy comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of joy is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of tranquillity is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of tranquillity is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of tranquillity is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of tranquillity is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of tranquillity comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of tranquillity is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of concentration is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of concentration is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of concentration is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of concentration is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of concentration comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of concentration is developed and reaches maturity.”

“When the enlightenment factor of equanimity is present in him he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of equanimity is present.’ When the enlightenment factor of equanimity is absent he knows, ‘The enlightenment factor of equanimity is absent.’ He also knows how the unarisen enlightenment factor of equanimity comes to arise, and how the arisen enlightenment factor of equanimity is developed and reaches maturity.”

“Thus he dwells contemplating mental-objects internally and externally. While contemplating mental-objects, he is aware that they arise and pass away. His awareness is established that mental-objects exist, but that they are not a being, nor a person, neither a woman nor a man, not a self nor anything pertaining to a self. He does not regard mental-objects as “I”, or “mine,” thus he clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the seven enlightenment factors.” [305]

#TheExpositionoftheTruthoftheCauseThe Truths Section

386. “Again, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the mental-objects of the four noble truths. How, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating mental-objects in the mental-objects of the four noble truths? Here, monks, a monk knows as it really is, “This is suffering, this is the origin of suffering, this is the cessation of suffering, this is the path leading to the cessation of suffering.”

The Exposition of the Truth of Suffering

387. “What, monks, is the noble truth of suffering? Birth is suffering, aging is suffering, death is suffering, grief, lamentation, pain, sorrow, and despair are suffering, association with the unloved is suffering, separation from the loved is suffering, not getting what one wishes is suffering, in brief the five aggregates of attachment are suffering.”

388. “What, monks, is birth? The coming into existence, the origination, the conception, arising in a new form, the appearance of the aggregates, the acquisition of sense-faculties in various beings — this, monks, is called birth.”

389. “What, monks, is aging? The process of aging and decrepitude, having broken teeth, grey hair, wrinkled skin, the fading of the life-force, the decline of the sense-faculties in various beings — this, monks, is called aging.”

390. “What, monks, is death? The decease, passing away, dissolution, disap­pear­ance, ending of life, passing away due to completion of the life-span, the breaking up of the aggregates, the discarding of the body, the destruction of the life-faculty of various beings — this, monks, is called death.”

391. “What, monks, is grief? [306] The grieving, sorrowing, and anxiety, the inward grief and wretchedness of one beset by any kind of ruinous loss, who is stricken by some painful misfortune — this, monks, is called grief.”

392. “What, monks, is lamentation? The weeping and lamenting, the act of weeping and lamenting, the crying and wailing of one beset by any kind of ruinous loss, who is stricken by some painful misfortune — this, monks, is called lamentation.”

393. “What, monks, is pain? The bodily pain and discomfort, the painful and unpleasant feeling produced by bodily contact — this, monks, is called pain.”

394. “What, monks, is sorrow? The mental pain and distress, the painful and unpleasant feeling produced by mental contact — this, monks, is called sorrow.”

395. “What, monks, is despair? The trouble and despair, the tribulation of one beset by any kind of ruinous loss, who is stricken by some painful misfortune — this, monks, is called despair.”

396. “What, monks, is the suffering of association with the unloved? Having to meet, be and remain in contact, or mingle with sights, sounds, odours, tastes, touches, and mind-objects that are undesirable, unpleasant or unenjoyable, or with beings who desire one’s harm, loss, discomfort, or bondage — this, monks, is called the suffering of association with the unloved.”

397. “What, monks, is the suffering of separation from the loved? Being unable to meet, be or remain in contact, or mix with sights, sounds, odours, tastes, touches and mind-objects that are desirable, pleasant or enjoyable, or with one’s mother, father, brothers, sisters, friends, colleagues, or blood relatives who desire one’s advantage, benefit, comfort, and freedom from bondage — this, monks, is called the suffering of separation from the loved.” [307]

398. “What, monks, is the suffering of not getting what one wishes? In beings subject to birth, monks, the wish may arise: ‘Oh that we were not subject to birth! Oh that new birth would not happen to us!’ However, it is not possible to get such a wish. This is the suffering of not getting what one wishes. In beings subject to aging, monks, the wish may arise: ‘Oh that we were not subject to aging! Oh that we would not get old!’ However, it is not possible to get such a wish. This too is the suffering of not getting what one wishes. In beings subject to disease, monks, the wish may arise: ‘Oh that we were not subject to disease! Oh that we would not get sick!’ However, it is not possible to get such a wish. This too is the suffering of not getting what one wishes. In beings subject to death, monks, the wish may arise: ‘Oh that we were not subject to death! Oh that we would not die!’ However, it is not possible to get such a wish. This too is the suffering of not getting what one wishes. In beings subject to grief, lamentation, pain, sorrow, and despair the wish may arise: ‘Oh that we were not subject to grief, lamentation, pain, sorrow, and despair! Oh that we would not experience grief, lamentation, pain, sorrow, and despair!’ However, it is not possible to get such a wish. This too is the suffering of not getting what one wishes.”

399. “What, monks, in brief, is the suffering of the five aggregates of attachment? They are the aggregate of attachment to form, the aggregate of attachment to feelings, the aggregate of attachment to perceptions, the aggregate of attach­ment to mental formations, and the aggregate of attachment to conscious­ness. This, monks, in brief, is called the suffering of the five aggregates of attachment. This, monks, is called the noble truth of suffering.” [308]

#TheExpositionoftheTruthofCessationThe Exposition of the Truth of the Cause

400. “What, monks, is the noble truth of the cause of suffering? The craving that gives rise to fresh rebirth, accompanied by delight and passion, finding great delight here and there, namely — craving for sensual pleasures craving for existence, and craving for non-existence.”

“When this craving arises, monks, where does it arise? When it establishes itself, where does it establish itself? When it arises and establishes itself, it does so in the delight and pleasure in the world. This is where craving arises and establishes itself.”

“Where are delight and pleasure in the world? In the ‘world’ of the eye are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself. In the ‘world’ of the ear … the nose … the tongue … the body … the mind are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of sights … sounds … odours … tastes … touches … ideas are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of eye-consciousness … ear-consciousness … nose-consciousness … tongue-consciousness … body-consciousness … mind-consciousness are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of eye-contact … ear-contact … nose-contact [309] … tongue-contact … body-contact … mind-contact are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of feeling born of eye-contact … ear-contact … nose-contact … tongue-contact … body-contact … feeling born of mind-contact are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual perception … auditory perception … olfactory perception … gustatory perception … tactile perception … mental perception are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual volition … auditory volition … olfactory volition … gustatory volition … tactile volition … mental volition are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual craving … auditory craving … olfactory craving … gustatory craving … tactile craving … mental craving are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual initial application … auditory initial application … olfactory initial application … gustatory initial application … tactile initial application … mental initial application are delight and pleasure, there craving arises and establishes itself.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual sustained application … auditory sustained application … olfactory sustained application … gustatory sustained application … tactile sustained application … mental sustained application are delight and pleasure, there craving [310] arises and establishes itself. This, monks, is called the noble truth of the cause of suffering.”

#TheExpositionoftheTruthofthePathThe Exposition of the Truth of Cessation

401. “What, monks, is the noble truth of the cessation of suffering? It is the cessation without remainder of this very craving, its relinquishing and discarding, the liberation and detachment from it.”

“When this craving, monks, is abandoned, where is it abandoned? When it ceases, where does it cease? When this craving is abandoned and ceases, it is abandoned and ceases to delight and take pleasure in whatever is delightful and pleasurable in the world.”

“Where are delight and pleasure in the world? In the ‘world’ of the eye are delight and pleasure, there craving ceases and is abandoned. In the ‘world’ of the ear … the nose … the tongue … the body … the mind, there craving is abandoned and ceases, there craving ceases to delight and take pleasure.”

“In the ‘world’ of sights … sounds … odours … tastes … touches … ideas are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of eye-consciousness … ear-consciousness … nose-consciousness … tongue-consciousness … body-consciousness … mind-consciousness are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of eye-contact … ear-contact … nose-contact … tongue-contact … body-contact … mind-contact [311] are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of feeling born of eye-contact … ear-contact … nose-contact … tongue-contact … body-contact … feeling born of mind-contact are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual perception … auditory perception … olfactory perception … gustatory perception … tactile perception … mental perception are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual volition … auditory volition … olfactory volition … gustatory volition … tactile volition … mental volition are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual craving … auditory craving … olfactory craving … gustatory craving … tactile craving … mental craving are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual initial application … auditory initial application … olfactory initial application … gustatory initial application … tactile initial application … mental initial application are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases.”

“In the ‘world’ of visual sustained application … auditory sustained application … olfactory sustained application … gustatory sustained application … tactile sustained application … mental sustained application are delight and pleasure, there craving is abandoned and ceases. This, monks, is called the noble truth of the cessation of suffering.”

#NotesThe Exposition of the Truth of the Path

402. “What, monks, is the noble truth of the path leading to the cessation of suffering? It is this very noble eightfold path, namely: right-view, right-thought, right-speech, right-action, right-livelihood, right-effort, right-mindfulness, and right concentration.”

“What, monks, is right-view? [312] Whatever, monks, is knowledge of suffering, knowledge of the cause of suffering, knowledge of the cessation of suffering, and knowledge of the path leading to the cessation of suffering; this, monk, is called right-view.”

“What, monks, is right-thought? Thoughts of renunciation, thoughts free from malice, thoughts free from cruelty; this, monks, is called right-thought.”

“What, monks, is right-speech? Abstaining from falsehood, abstaining from back-biting, abstaining from abuse, and abstaining from idle-chatter; this, monks, is called right-speech.”

“What, monks, is right-action? Abstaining from killing living-beings, abstaining from taking what is not given, abstaining from sexual misconduct; this, monks, is called right-action.”

“What, monks, is right-livelihood? Here, monks, a noble disciple, having abandoned wrong-livelihood, earns a living with a right-livelihood; this, monks, is called right-livelihood.”

“What, monks, is right-effort? Here, monks, a monk generates will, stirs up energy, applies his mind, and strives for the non-arising of evil, unwholesome states that have not yet arisen; generates will, stirs up energy, applies his mind, and strives for the abandoning of evil, unwholesome states that have arisen; generates will, stirs up energy, applies his mind, and strives for the arising of wholesome states that have not yet arisen; generates will, stirs up energy, applies his mind, [313] and strives for the maintenance, non-disappearance, and development of wholesome states that have arisen. This, monks, is called right-effort.”

“What, monks, is right-mindfulness? Here, monks, a monk dwells contemplating the body in the body, ardent, clearly comprehending, and mindful, having overcome covetousness and sorrow concerning the world; he dwell contemplating feelings in feelings, … he dwells contemplating thoughts in thoughts … he dwells contemplating mental-objects in mental-objects ardent, clearly comprehending and mindful, having overcome covetousness and sorrow concerning the world. This, monks, is called right-mindfulness.”

“What, monks, is right-concentration? Here, monks, a monk aloof from sensual thoughts, aloof from unwholesome states, attains to and abides in the first absorption with initial application, sustained application, with joy and bliss born of seclusion [from the hindrances]. With the calming of initial and sustained application, with the mind inwardly tranquil he attains to and abides in the second absorption without initial and sustained application, with joy and bliss born of concentration. With the abandoning of pleasure and pain and the extinguishing of the former happiness and sorrow, he attains to and abides in the fourth absorption purified by equanimity and mindfulness. This, monks, is called right-concentration. This monks, is called the noble truth of the path leading to the cessation of suffering.

403. “Thus he dwells contemplating mental-objects internally [314] and externally. While contemplating mental-objects, he is aware that they arise and pass away. His awareness is established that mental-objects exist, but that they are not a being, nor a person, neither a woman nor a man, not a self nor anything pertaining to a self. He does not regard mental-objects as “I”, or “mine,” thus he clings to nothing in the world. Thus, monks, a monk dwells contemplating mental-objects in the for noble truths.”

404. “Whoever, monks, thus develops these four foundations of mindfulness for seven years can expect one of two fruits — final knowledge in this very life, or if there is any remainder, the attainment of Non-returning.”

“Let alone, monks, seven years. Whoever, monks, thus develops these four foundations of mindfulness for six years … five years … four years … three years … two years … one year … Let alone, monks, one year. Whoever, monks, thus develops these four foundations of mindfulness for seven months can expect one of two fruits — final knowledge in this very life, or if there is any remainder, the attainment of Non-returning.”

“Let alone, monks, seven months. Whoever, monks, thus develops these four foundations of mindfulness for six months … five months … four months … three months … two months … [315] one month … half a month … Let alone half a month, monks. Whoever, monks, thus develops these four foundations of mindfulness for seven days can expect one of two fruits — final knowledge in this very life, or if there is any remainder, the attainment of Non-returning.”

405. “That is why it was said: ‘This is the only way, monks, for the purification of beings, for the transcendence of grief and lamentation, for the extinguishing of pain and sorrow, for attaining the right method, for the realisation of nibbāna, that is to say the four foundations of mindfulness.’

Thus spoke the Blessed One. The monks rejoiced in what the Blessed One had said.

#MahasatipatthanaTopNotes:

1. The skin pentad.

2. The kidneys pentad.

3. The lungs pentad.

4. The brain pentad.

5. The fat sextad.

6. The urine sextad.

7. Sarāgaṃ = lustful, with passion. All types of greedy thoughts should be included here: desire, greed, craving, covetousness, etc.

8. Sadosaṃ = angry. All types of angry thoughts should be included here: ill-will, aversion, hatred, rage, annoyed, frustrated, disappointed, irritated, etc.

9. Samohaṃ = with delusion. All types of deluded thoughts should be included here: confused, conceited, proud, doubtful, etc.

10. Saṅkhittaṃ = contracted, shrinking back from the task, lazy, bored, pessimistic, etc.

11. Vikkhittaṃ = distracted, restless, agitated, excited, upset, perplexed, etc.

12. Mahāggata = lofty, grown great, elevated, as in the absorptions (jhāna).

13. Amahāggata = non-lofty, thoughts connected with the sensual realm.

14. Sa-uttara = inferior, with other thoughts that are superior to it.

15. Anuttara = superior, with no other thoughts that are superior to it.

16. Samāhitaṃ = composed, concentrated, not scattered. Access concentration or absorption.

17. Vimuttaṃ = liberated, free from defilements.


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