Home Previous Up Next

The Buddha

What's New?

Classes

Retreats

Videos

Forums

Blog

Books

Mahāsi Sayādaw

Ledi Sayādaw

Other Authors

Bhikkhu Pesala

Discourses

DPPN

Help

Contact Us

Pāḷi Words

Map of India

Related Links

Photos

OpenType Fonts


Parent Folder Previous Page

© You may print any of these books for your own use. However, all rights are reserved. You may not use any of the site content on your own website, nor for commercial distribution. To publish the books, permission must be sought from the appropriate copyright owners. If you post an extract on a forum, post a link to the appropriate page. Please do not link directly to PDF, MP3, or ZIP files. (Updated on 20 January, 2018)




Home Next Page

Kimila Suttaṃ

(A.iv.64)

A Discourse to Kimila

Thus have I heard — At one time the Blessed One was dwelling with Kimila at the Mango pine (nicula) grove. Then the Venerable Kimila approached the Blessed One; having approached and paid homage to the Blessed One, he sat down at one side. Sitting at one side the Venerable Kimila said to the Blessed One:–

“What, Venerable sir, is the reason, what is the root cause that the good teaching does not last long after the final passing away of the Tathāgata?”

“Herein, Kimila, after the Tathāgata’s final passing away if the monks and nuns, male and female lay disciples dwell without respect (agāravā) and docility (appatissā towards the teacher, without respect and docility towards the teaching, without respect and docility towards the monastic community, without respect and docility towards the trainingwithout respect and docility towards concentration,³ without respect and docility towards heedfulness,⁴ without respect and docility towards hospitality.⁵ This, Kimila, is the reason, this is the root cause why, after the Tathāgata’s final passing away, that the good teaching does not last long.

“What, Venerable sir, is the reason, what is the root cause that the good teaching lasts for a long time after the final passing away of the Tathāgata?”

“Herein, Kimila, after the Tathāgata’s final passing away if the monks and nuns, male and female lay disciples dwell with respect and docility towards the teacher, with respect and docility towards the teaching, with respect and docility towards the monastic community, with respect and docility towards the training, with respect and docility towards concentration, with respect and docility towards heedfulness, with respect and docility towards hospitality. This, Kimila, is the reason, this is the root cause why, after the Tathāgata’s final passing away, that the good teaching does not last long.

Notes:

1. Rebellious, difficult to instruct.

2. The training rules for monks and nuns contained in the Vinaya, and the training rules for householder in the five or eight precepts, the Siṅgāla Sutta, Maṅgala Sutta, etc.

3. Lay people and monastics should practise meditation exercises to develop concentration.

4. Being devoted to wakefulness, energetic striving, and the practice of mindfulness (satipaṭṭhāna).

5. Keeping an open door to welcome visitors and cultivate friendly relationships. The Buddha said that good friendship is the whole of the holy life. A good friend encourages you to perform wholesome deeds and restrains you from evil deeds. As it is the nature of water to run downhill, it is only natural for the mind to incline towards what is easy, and to shun what is difficult, so left to our own devices without good friendship we will not naturally incline towards wholesome deeds. A meditation teacher should be sought out who can arouse faith and energy.

www.000webhost.com