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Andha Suttaṃ

(A.i.129)

The Blind

“These three individuals, monks, are found in the world. What three? The blind,¹ the one-eyed, and the two-eyed.

“And what, monks, is the blind person? Here, monks, one person does not have the vision (cakkhuto obtain the wealth not yet acquired or to increase that wealth already acquired; he or she lacks the vision to discern ³ (jāneyya) wholesome and unwholesome states, blameworthy and blameless states, inferior or superior states, dark and bright states with their opposites (paṭibhāga). This, monks, is called a blind person.

“And what, monks, is the one-eyed person? Here, monks, one person has the vision to obtain the wealth not yet acquired and to increase that wealth already acquired, but lacks the vision to discern wholesome and unwholesome states, blameworthy and blameless states, inferior or superior states, dark and bright states with their opposites. This, monks, is called a one-eyed person.

“And what, monks, is the two-eyed person? Here, monks, one person has the vision to obtain the wealth not yet acquired and to increase that wealth already acquired, and has the vision to discern wholesome and unwholesome states, blameworthy and blameless states, inferior or superior states, dark and bright states with their opposites. This, monks, is called a two-eyed person.

“These three individuals, monks, are found in the world.”

“Neither having the vision to acquire wealth, nor to acquire merit.
In both ways he casts the unlucky dice, the blind person whose vision is destroyed.

“The fraudulent hypocrite is a one-eyed person
Who seeks wealth sometimes honestly and sometimes dishonestly.

“With thieving and deceitful intentions, and telling lies,
Skilled at acquiring wealth, the man who enjoys sensuality
Having gone from here to hell, the one-eyed person grieves.

“The two-eyed person, however, is the most excellent
Gaining property honestly, becoming wealthy through industriousness.

“He gives with the best of intentions,⁴ with an unconfused mind.
He goes to a fortunate state, where having gone he does not grieve.

“The blind and the one-eyed, one should keep far away from them.
The two-eyed, however, one should follow, the most excellent person.”

Notes

1. See also Dhammapada v 174: “Andhabhūto ayaṃ loko…”

2. Literally the kind eye to see properly (tathārūpaṃ cakkhu na hoti yathārūpena cakkhunā).

3. To know the difference.

4. Donation is of three kinds: Inferior donation (hīna-dāna), medium donation (majjhima-dāna), and superior donation (paṇīta-dāna). Donations given for the sake of fame or gain are inferior; those given believing in the law of kamma are medium; those done because it is the practice of the Noble Ones, or to acquire perfections are superior.

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